Social Diversity, Partisan Identities and the 2019 Canadian Election

Social Diversity, Partisan Identities and the 2019 Canadian Election

   ,
  12:30 - 2 p.m.
   Online (Off Campus)
Allison Harell

In this talk, political scientist Allison Harell draws on the 2019 Canadian Election Study to explore the ways in which intergroup dynamics structure vote choice in Canada. She focuses in particular on how partisan identities and political preferences are anchored in key social cleavages in Canada that structured the way in which the 2019 election campaign played out.

About the Speaker:
Allison Harell holds the UQAM Research Chair in the Political Psychology of Social Solidarity in the Department of Political Science at the Université du Québec à Montréal. She is interested in how social diversity affects the political world, especially the ways in which prejudice influences public opinion formation. Drawing primarily on large-scale survey experimental research, Harell has analyzed many aspects of attitudes held about and by groups in industrialized democracies, and their effects on policy attitudes and political behaviour. She has been the principal and co-investigator on a number of large comparative studies (including the Canadian Election Study, the Comparative Youth Study, the Race, Gender and the Welfare State Survey and the Comparative Rights Survey) and has been at the forefront of developing experimental online protocols in Canada to measure the effect of group cues on public policy attitudes. Her current research focuses on how intergroup relations influence support for both economic and political solidarity, as well as how intergroup perceptions spill over into electoral politics.

Harell currently co-directs the Consortium on Electoral Democracy. She also founded the Public Opinion and Political Communication Lab at the Université du Québec à Montréal and is associate director of the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship.