Psychedelics, eh? Canada's Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance

Psychedelics, eh? Canada's Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance

   ,
  12:30 - 2 p.m.
   Online (Off Campus)
Erika Dyck

In the 1950's, the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was on the cutting edge of research into hallucinogenic drugs. Under the province's massive healthcare reforms, researchers received grants to pursue LSD treatments they thought could revolutionize psychiatry. What do these experiments say about Canada's healthcare system and society at the time? And what can we learn from the program's successes and failures at a time when psychedelics are attracting renewed scientific and public interest?

Erika Dyck is the Canada Research Chair in the History of Health & Social Justice at the University of Saskatchewan. She specializes in the history of psychiatry, and has written several books on the history of psychedelic research and eugenics in Canada. She is the author of "Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus" (Johns Hopkins University Press), which covers the complex history of LSD in North America.