Julia Lewandoski

Julia Lewandoski
Transitional Land Tenure Practices in Quebec and Louisiana
Fall 2016
Julia Lewandoski
Edward E. Hildebrand Research Fellowship

Julia Lewandoski is a Ph.D. candidate in History with a Designated Emphasis in Science and Technology Studies. Her doctoral work brings together indigenous, legal, and scientific history to study land tenure regimes across contested imperial and indigenous territories in eighteenth and nineteenth century North America. Her dissertation compares the impact of imperial transitions on indigenous land in Quebec, Louisiana, and Southern California. She is broadly interested in the history of cartography, the Atlantic world, indigenous history, and historical theory. She spent the summer of 2015 researching her dissertation "Transitional Land Tenure Practices in Quebec and Louisiana" in Montreal, New Orleans and Baton Rouge. This academic year she will be working on her next dissertation "Real Properties: Imperial Treaties, Land Surveys, and Indigineous Territories in North America."